Volume 5, Issue 6, December 2017, Page: 188-199
Evaluation of the Most Significant Treatment Factors for Maize Grain Yields and Total Microbial Count in Long Term Agricultural Experiment (LTAE), Kenya
Wambua Alex Mwaniki, Department of Planning and Statistics, Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, Nairobi, Kenya
Koske Joseph, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya
Mutiso John, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya
Mulinge Wellington, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Nairobi, Kenya
Kibunja Catherine, Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, Nairobi, Kenya
Eboi Bramuel, Department of Planning and Statistics, Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, Nairobi, Kenya
Received: Sep. 18, 2017;       Accepted: Oct. 8, 2017;       Published: Nov. 11, 2017
DOI: 10.11648/j.sjams.20170506.11      View  1568      Downloads  59
Abstract
Agriculture and its related economic activities form the main livelihood for Kenya population. The sector faces numerous challenges that have led to food insecurity in the country. Maize production plays a significant role in the country’ economic development contributing significantly to the national overall Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Declining maize grain yield is one of the major challenges that require interventions to avert the looming food crisis. To address the challenge various Long Term Agricultural Experiments (LTAE) and studies on soil fertility maintainance options have been developed. However, such studies have explored only single factors at a time with limited application of robust statistical application. Statistical procedures could offer best set of few treatment factors that explain the maize grain yields in LTAEs in Kenya and beyond. The focus of this paper was the application of robust statistical methods in obtaining set of minimum treatment factors that could be used in the determination maize grain yield in LTAE. Specifically, the paper sought to describe the trend in maize grain yield over the experimental period, characterize the input factors for maize grain yield and to determine the most significant treatment factors for maize grain yield and total microbial population count (bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, rhizobia). The primary data was summarized from LTAE in National Agricultural Research Laboratories (NARL), Kabete under the Kenya Agriculture and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO) and secondary data imputed for experimental points falling outside the set field experimental design points. Two treatment factors were isolated (Farm Yard Manure (FYM) and Nitrogen and Phosphorus (NP)) at their low factor levels as the most significant treatment factor in maximizing the maize grain yield and total microbial population count. It was possible to select a minimum set of treatment factors in LTAE that are critical in predicting the maize grain yield.
Keywords
Robust Statistical Analysis, Long Term Agricultural Experiments, Maize Trends, Total Microbes Population Count
To cite this article
Wambua Alex Mwaniki, Koske Joseph, Mutiso John, Mulinge Wellington, Kibunja Catherine, Eboi Bramuel, Evaluation of the Most Significant Treatment Factors for Maize Grain Yields and Total Microbial Count in Long Term Agricultural Experiment (LTAE), Kenya, Science Journal of Applied Mathematics and Statistics. Vol. 5, No. 6, 2017, pp. 188-199. doi: 10.11648/j.sjams.20170506.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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